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Around Atlanta, recent snapshots from a bygone city

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Random glimpses from a rapidly changing urban landscape

The Beltline, before your mom wanted to live there.
Photos: Curbed Atlanta

Since its inception, Atlanta has had an almost insatiable appetite for construction, and the city has certainly taken lumps for subsequent, unflinching destruction. But this raze-and-build-anew craze may have never been as ubiquitous as right now, in post-recession Atlanta.

With summer’s building frenzy in full swing from Brookhaven to College Park, it seemed an opportune time to pause for a moment and reflect on a city that was vastly different, in many places, just a few years ago.

We’ve dug deep into the photo archives to find vantages and places that don’t exist in Atlanta anymore — some for the better, others probably not.

So lace up your kicks, and have a stroll down this built-environment memory lane ...

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In the summer of 2013, anyone exiting Savi Urban Market in Inman Park would find this across the street. The collection of low-rise retail and office structures (and one very busy valet lot) was replaced by Inman Quarter:

Curbed Atlanta

Here’s another angle from Highland Avenue:

Curbed Atlanta

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Before the Atlanta Beltline’s Eastside Trail was winning international accolades for urban redevelopment, and before the advent of trail-adjacent hotspots like Ladybird Grove & Mess Hall and the Bantam Pub, the neglected former rail corridor was a desolate, itchy place, as seen here in 2011 and 2012:

The trail entrance at Irwin Street.
Beltline photos: Curbed Atlanta
Beneath Highland Avenue.
The Freedom Parkway overpass.
This Old Fourth Ward lot, pre-townhomes.
The beginnings of Historic Fourth Ward Park’s active field and skatepark, long before the yoga hordes.
In the distance, the hulking brick structure that would become Ponce City Market.
This makeshift bridge offered hope that the Eastside Trail might actually happen.

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By the fall of 2013, this prime slice of Midtown real estate across the street from the High Museum had festered for years. John Wieland’s pricey, ultra-exclusive One Museum Place condos are currently finishing here:

Curbed Atlanta

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Speaking of Wieland, the veteran Atlanta developer bulldozed this circa-1929 Old Fourth Ward structure — originally James G. Dodson's Ironized Yeast Company before being taken over by the Creomulsion Company — and its inimitable architectural features in early 2015, despite concerns from neighborhood officials:

Curbed Atlanta

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Here’s Krog Street Market in 2013, before Bon Appétit magazine named it "one of the country’s coolest food halls" (and before the advent of $14 sandwiches) ...

KSM photos: Curbed Atlanta
The corner space that would become Ford Fry’s Superica.

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Inside Ponce City Market just two years ago, which Travel + Leisure magazine has called one of the world’s top new tourist attractions:

The Market Hall in summer 2014.
PCM photos: Curbed Atlanta
The Ponce de Leon Avenue entrance, in more forlorn days.

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On the Westside’s Howell Mill Road, this parking lot (as seen in 2013) would make way for mixed-use venture The Brady:

Curbed Atlanta
The view from The Brady’s amenities deck today.
Curbed Atlanta

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Also on Howell Mill Road, here’s the industrial Westside Ironworks project in 2015:

Curbed Atlanta
The adaptive-reuse property in January.
Curbed Atlanta

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This was the Project Formerly Known as Buckhead Atlanta in August 2013, still very much a work-in-progress:

Curbed Atlanta

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Before Fuqua Development’s gargantuan Krobar at Glenwood Place, there was this site, as seen in early 2015, next-door to Glenwood Park:

Curbed Atlanta

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This makeshift, fenced-off skatepark and dog kennels along North Avenue became the 755 North apartments:

Barbed wire and a stop-work notice from 2012.
Curbed Atlanta

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It’s hard to believe such a vast parking lot, as seen two years ago, lasted so long in the heart of Midtown:

Curbed Atlanta

And so on and so forth ...