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In Atlanta’s Highlands, ultra-modern, copper-clad townhouse seeks $610K

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Location touted as the “epitome of walkability”

A modern townhouse for sale in Atlanta’s Virginia-Highland neighborhood.
The for-sale unit is at far right.
RE/MAX; photos: Garey Gomez

The exuberant listing description for this unique, copper-clad townhouse on Ponce de Leon Avenue begins with a true assertion: “Admit It! You've passed by these modern townhome[s] dozens of times and wondered what's it like inside?”

With properties so strikingly different in such a prominent location, it’s tough not to wonder. Especially when they rarely become available.

Now, this listing for the most eastern unit of the ultra-modern bunch provides answers.

Inside, these are soaring, stylish spaces with plenty of intriguing architectural elements (see: the custom kitchen, living-room walls) and window arrangements. And they still look pretty cutting-edge, despite their 2007 vintage. It’s a case where vertical photos are necessity.

Called “Plexus on Ponce,” this project by Plexus r+d was marketed as a “piece of art” when it finished a decade ago. Another unit came up for rent here last year at $3,000 monthly.

Now, the for-sale property is asking $609,900 (with zero HOA fees). That buys three bedrooms, two full bathrooms (two partial), and less square footage than one might think (1,760). That count doesn’t include the too-cool rooftop terrace, of course.

UPDATE: The listing has since been clarified to reflect 2,000 square feet here, based on original architectural drawings, according to the listing agent.

Other perks: the floating stairs, sleek pocket doors, and at least one other outdoor living space off the kitchen.

The spacious garage might be awkwardly accessed, but it’s clearly adequate for race-car storage. It also comes with its own half-bathroom and workshop area, for buyers feeling crafty.

With Little Five Points and all the splendors of Highland Avenue nearby, the location is described as being the “epitome of walkability.”