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Photos: Music legend Kenny Rogers’s greatest home real estate hits around Atlanta

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The late crooner and longtime Georgian knew when to hold ’em and when to fold ’em, you might say

A photo of a long elaborate driveway leading up to a Buckhead palatial estate.
One of Kenny Rogers’s former homes, in Buckhead’s Tuxedo Park.
Harry Norman Realtors, via TopRealEstateDeals.com

The late country music star Kenny Rogers wore many hats—and not just cowboy hats.

Rogers, who passed away at age 81 on Friday at his Sandy Springs home, not only topped charts for record sales, he also acted, wrote, operated restaurants, founded charities, shot photos, and once faked out—and scored on—basketball great Michael Jordan during a charity game.

And he knew how to flip homes.

The Gambler” began cutting his teeth in real estate in Beverly Hills, renovating a mansion “with good bones” and unloading it for a record $20 million at the time, according to TopTenRealEstateDeals.com.

By the early 2000s, Rogers had made his way to the metro Atlanta real estate market, purchasing a bank-owned, 27,000-square-foot estate for $2.75 million—more than $9 million below the asking price.

He sold it in 2006 for $8.5 million, according to the website.

A massive mansion sits amid abundant trees and sprawling greens.
The Beaver Dam Farm estate outside of Athens.

Then, he took his talents to a town outside Athens, where he developed the nearly 1,000-acre Beaver Dam Farm, which sold for $10.5 million in 2011.

And in Atlanta’s tony Tuxedo Park neighborhood, in 2009, Rogers snagged a home for $2.8 million—it had been listed for nearly $8 million—and flipped it for $3.725 million.

A huge kitchen with a long row of banquette seating.
The Buckhead home’s kitchen.
A big master bedroom in Atlanta with a huge fireplace and coffered, gilded ceilings overhead.
The ornate master suite.

In recent years, Rogers purchased and upgraded a Sandy Springs mansion, where he raised his twin sons.

Rogers unsuccessfully tried selling the roughly 12,000-square-foot mammoth about six years ago and lived there with his family until his death.

A winding driveway leads down to a Mediterranean-style mansion.
Rogers’s Sandy Springs mansion, where he passed away on Friday.
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com