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Atlanta's gorgeous intown historic churches, mapped!

Just in time for the holiday season, check out these beautiful old churches

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The holidays are fast approaching, promising plenty of overeating, too much family time, and — for the CEO churchgoers — the semi-annual trek to church.

For those new to the city, or those hoping to switch up routines, or even people who just like old ecclesiastic architecture, here's a map of places to check out.

With an array of beautiful historic places of worship in the heart of Atlanta, there's no shortage of options.

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All Saints' Episcopal Church

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Completed at the corner of North Avenue and West Peachtree Street in 1906, the Victorian Gothic church is constructed of distinctive red stone. Inside, the sanctuary features a red apse, ornately carved wood ceilings and beams, and beautiful stained glass windows, some of which were crafted by Tiffany studios.

Atlanta First United Methodist Church

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The Gothic Revival church, located on Peachtree Street, features the only known church bell to have survived the Civil War in the city. Built from Stone Mountain granite, the current building dates to 1903 and was designed by Willis Franklin Denny.

Big Bethel AME Church

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Known for its giant "Jesus Saves" sign visible from the Connector, the J. A. Lankford and Alexander Hamilton-designed Romanesque Revival building has stood on the site since 1922, constructed on the site of a Victorian structure which burned in 1920. The oldest African-American congregation in Sweet Auburn, the church has a storied history, including appearance by Howard Taft and Nelson Mandela.

Butler Street Christian Methodist Episcopal Church

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Constructed in 1920 on what was then called Butler Street, the understated Neo-Gothic Revival orange-brick building sits across the street from the growing Grady Hospital complex and a block over from the Sweet Auburn Curb Market.

Catholic Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

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According to the Church, the congregation dates back to 1840s, making it the oldest church in north Georgia and Atlanta's first Catholic church. Construction on the building at Central Avenue and MLK, Jr. Drive, just south of Underground Atlanta, commenced following the Civil War and finished in 1873. Heavily damaged in a fire in 1982, the building was reconstructed to the original design by W. H. Parkins.

Central Presbyterian Church

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Founded before the Civil War, the church sits on a site across from the State Capitol Building. Constructed in 1885, the English Gothic stone building was designed by Dougherty & Gardner and Edmund George Lind.

First Church Of Christ, Scientist

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Located across the street from the Woodruff Arts Center and Colony Square in the heart of Midtown, snuggled against Ansley Park, the Greek Revival building was designed by Arthur Neal Robinson and completed in 1914.

First Congregational Church

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The church of choice for prominent African American Atlantans including Alonzo Herndon and Andrew Young, the congregation has a long history in the eastern downtown area. Constructed in 1908, the building fuses Italian Renaissance vernacular and some elements of the Spanish Mission style, and was designed by Robert E. Pharrow, Alexander Campbell Bruce, and Arthur Greene Everett.

First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta

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Completed in 1919, the large church building was designed by W. T. Downing and E. C. Wachendorf. A fusion of Romanesque and Gothic style, the red-brown hued stone sanctuary stands just north of the High Museum on Peachtree Street.

Lutheran Church of the Redeemer

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Founded in 1905, the first sanctuary of the congregation was located downtown. The present location in Midtown, built of Tennessee quartzite and Indiana limestone, is a quasi-Gothic sanctuary featuring sleek lines and almost Art Deco massing that belies its 1952 completion.

North Avenue Presbyterian Church

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Established by parishioners from downtown's Central Presbyterian Church as the city expanded, the church has roots in the years following the Civil War. Opened in 1900, the stone Romanesque church sits just down the street from the Fox Theatre at North Avenue and Peachtree Street and features windows by Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Peachtree Christian Church

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The Gothic Revival church, located in far north Midtown on Peachtree Road, was completed in 1928. Designed by Charles H. Hopson, the building is a distinctive red brick edifice with limestone quoins and trim around large stained glass windows.

Saint Mark United Methodist Church

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Construction of the grey granite church building on Peachtree Street at 5th Street began in 1902 after the congregation relocated from downtown. The church is now in the process of selling off land on the surrounding block, but plans to remain in the historic sanctuary.

St Paul's Presbyterian Church

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Designed by noted ecclesiastic architect Charles H. Hopson, the Gothic Revival church on Ponce de Leone Avenue was completed in 1916 just two blocks from the Fox Theatre and Georgia Terrace Hotel. Built for the Ponce de Leon Methodist Episcopal Church, it served as a restaurant for nearly 30 years before becoming a church again in 2006.

St. Luke's Episcopal Church

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While the current red brick building on Peachtree Street at the northern reaches of downtown was constructed in 1906, the history of the church on the site dates back to the Civil War. With stained glass from around the world, the interior of the sanctuary is bathed in an array of colors.

The Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

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The red Romanesque church building at the northern end of the downtown business district was designed in 1897 by Atlanta architect W. T. Downing. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the church was elevated to a minor basilica by Pope Benedict XVI.

The Temple

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The only non-Christian historic house of worship in Midtown, the neoclassical Temple was designed by noted Atlanta classicist Philip Trammell Shutze in 1931. While dramatically scaled back from the pre-Depression plans, the sanctuary takes cues from Venetian churches Shutze saw while studying in Rome.

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All Saints' Episcopal Church

Completed at the corner of North Avenue and West Peachtree Street in 1906, the Victorian Gothic church is constructed of distinctive red stone. Inside, the sanctuary features a red apse, ornately carved wood ceilings and beams, and beautiful stained glass windows, some of which were crafted by Tiffany studios.

Atlanta First United Methodist Church

The Gothic Revival church, located on Peachtree Street, features the only known church bell to have survived the Civil War in the city. Built from Stone Mountain granite, the current building dates to 1903 and was designed by Willis Franklin Denny.

Big Bethel AME Church

Known for its giant "Jesus Saves" sign visible from the Connector, the J. A. Lankford and Alexander Hamilton-designed Romanesque Revival building has stood on the site since 1922, constructed on the site of a Victorian structure which burned in 1920. The oldest African-American congregation in Sweet Auburn, the church has a storied history, including appearance by Howard Taft and Nelson Mandela.

Butler Street Christian Methodist Episcopal Church

Constructed in 1920 on what was then called Butler Street, the understated Neo-Gothic Revival orange-brick building sits across the street from the growing Grady Hospital complex and a block over from the Sweet Auburn Curb Market.

Catholic Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

According to the Church, the congregation dates back to 1840s, making it the oldest church in north Georgia and Atlanta's first Catholic church. Construction on the building at Central Avenue and MLK, Jr. Drive, just south of Underground Atlanta, commenced following the Civil War and finished in 1873. Heavily damaged in a fire in 1982, the building was reconstructed to the original design by W. H. Parkins.

Central Presbyterian Church

Founded before the Civil War, the church sits on a site across from the State Capitol Building. Constructed in 1885, the English Gothic stone building was designed by Dougherty & Gardner and Edmund George Lind.

First Church Of Christ, Scientist

Located across the street from the Woodruff Arts Center and Colony Square in the heart of Midtown, snuggled against Ansley Park, the Greek Revival building was designed by Arthur Neal Robinson and completed in 1914.

First Congregational Church

The church of choice for prominent African American Atlantans including Alonzo Herndon and Andrew Young, the congregation has a long history in the eastern downtown area. Constructed in 1908, the building fuses Italian Renaissance vernacular and some elements of the Spanish Mission style, and was designed by Robert E. Pharrow, Alexander Campbell Bruce, and Arthur Greene Everett.

First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta

Completed in 1919, the large church building was designed by W. T. Downing and E. C. Wachendorf. A fusion of Romanesque and Gothic style, the red-brown hued stone sanctuary stands just north of the High Museum on Peachtree Street.

Lutheran Church of the Redeemer

Founded in 1905, the first sanctuary of the congregation was located downtown. The present location in Midtown, built of Tennessee quartzite and Indiana limestone, is a quasi-Gothic sanctuary featuring sleek lines and almost Art Deco massing that belies its 1952 completion.

North Avenue Presbyterian Church

Established by parishioners from downtown's Central Presbyterian Church as the city expanded, the church has roots in the years following the Civil War. Opened in 1900, the stone Romanesque church sits just down the street from the Fox Theatre at North Avenue and Peachtree Street and features windows by Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Peachtree Christian Church

The Gothic Revival church, located in far north Midtown on Peachtree Road, was completed in 1928. Designed by Charles H. Hopson, the building is a distinctive red brick edifice with limestone quoins and trim around large stained glass windows.

Saint Mark United Methodist Church

Construction of the grey granite church building on Peachtree Street at 5th Street began in 1902 after the congregation relocated from downtown. The church is now in the process of selling off land on the surrounding block, but plans to remain in the historic sanctuary.

St Paul's Presbyterian Church

Designed by noted ecclesiastic architect Charles H. Hopson, the Gothic Revival church on Ponce de Leone Avenue was completed in 1916 just two blocks from the Fox Theatre and Georgia Terrace Hotel. Built for the Ponce de Leon Methodist Episcopal Church, it served as a restaurant for nearly 30 years before becoming a church again in 2006.

St. Luke's Episcopal Church

While the current red brick building on Peachtree Street at the northern reaches of downtown was constructed in 1906, the history of the church on the site dates back to the Civil War. With stained glass from around the world, the interior of the sanctuary is bathed in an array of colors.

The Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

The red Romanesque church building at the northern end of the downtown business district was designed in 1897 by Atlanta architect W. T. Downing. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the church was elevated to a minor basilica by Pope Benedict XVI.

The Temple

The only non-Christian historic house of worship in Midtown, the neoclassical Temple was designed by noted Atlanta classicist Philip Trammell Shutze in 1931. While dramatically scaled back from the pre-Depression plans, the sanctuary takes cues from Venetian churches Shutze saw while studying in Rome.