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Three-story house with four columns and lots of windows.
Hills & Dales in LaGrange presents a striking facade.
Karon Warren

Top 10 home tours in and near Atlanta

Fans of both architecture and history will find something to love in this group

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Hills & Dales in LaGrange presents a striking facade.
| Karon Warren

Although there’s a constant focus on the latest, greatest new homes and development in Atlanta, let’s not forget the city and its satellite towns are home to some truly landmark older homes as well. Some may be architectural beauties, others historical sites that allure.

From the homes of authors to philanthropists and former presidents, Georgia offers quite a collection of notable residences. And, lucky for architecture and history enthusiasts, these are open for tours. So go on, get an up-close-and-personal look inside.

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1. Governor's Mansion

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391 West Paces Ferry Rd NW
Atlanta, GA 30305
(404) 261-1776
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Following the Greek Revival style, the Georgia Governor’s Mansion on West Paces Ferry Road features 30 rooms on three floors. Designed by Georgia architect A. Thomas Bradbury, the 1967 residence actually first opened on January 1, 1968, with Lester Maddox as the first governor to call it home. The 24,000-square-foot residence is open for free tours on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays between 10 and 11:30 a.m.

To prepare for Christmas tours, the home generally closes to the public in mid-November and reopens at the beginning of December. Check the website for a current tour schedule.

2. Old Governors Mansion

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Old Governors Mansion
Milledgeville, GA 31061

Long before Atlanta was named the state capital for Georgia, Milledgeville held that honor. As such, an official governor’s residence was in order. Hence, Georgia’s Old Governor’s Mansion was completed in 1839. Designed by architect Charles Cluskey, the High Greek Revival home remained in service until 1868.

Tours are available Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m. It does close for holidays, so check the schedule before going. Tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors age 60 and older, $2 for students, and free for children younger than 6.

3. Swan House

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3130 Slaton Dr NW
Atlanta, GA 30305
(404) 261-0636
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Located in Buckhead at the Atlanta History Center, the Swan House continues to be an iconic destination for history and architecture buffs. Built in 1928 as the home of Edward and Emily Inman, the home was a notable project in the portfolio of renowned architect Philip Trammell Shutze.

It’s open for tours Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. A behind-the-scenes tour also is offered daily at 4 p.m. for $10 per person plus general admission to the Atlanta History Center. General admission tickets to the Atlanta History Center are $21.50 for adults, $18 for seniors ages 65 and older, $18 for students ages 13 and older, and $9 for children ages 4 to 12.

The exterior of Swan house in Atlanta. The house is white and is surrounded by trees, shrubs, and grass. Julie Anne Photography LLC

4. Roosevelt's Little White House Historic Site

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401 Little White House Rd
Warm Springs, GA 31830
(706) 655-5870
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Built in 1932 by Franklin D. Roosevelt during his tenure as governor of New York, the Little White House in Warm Springs served as an escape for the man who became president in 1933. But his journey to Warm Springs actually began in 1924 when Roosevelt first visited Warm Springs to take advantage of the area’s curative springs for his polio. While he was not cured, he did improve, and, thus, continued to return here often.

Today, visitors can tour the Little White House, which is preserved much as he left it, as well as the servant and guest quarters, the warm springs pools, and a memorial museum. Site hours are 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. daily. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors ages 62 and older, $7 for kids ages 6 to 17, and $2 for children younger than 6.

The exterior of Roosevelt’s little white house historic site in Atlanta. The facade is white with a grey roof. There are columns near the entrance and a chimney on the roof. Georgia Department of Natural Resources

5. Hills & Dales Estate

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1916 Hills and Dales Dr
LaGrange, GA 30240
(706) 882-3242
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Completed as it stands today in 1916 by Fuller E. Callaway, HIlls & Dales in LaGrange actually stands on the same grounds as the home of the property’s previous owner, Sarah Ferrell. It was “Miss Sarah” who started the gardens here. After her death, Callaway bought the property, replacing the previous house with the grand design you see today. His wife, Ida Cason Callaway, would carry on Sarah’s legacy in the gardens as would her daughter-in-law, Alice Hand Callaway.

Tours are available on a seasonal schedule, with tickets available for both house and garden admission as well as garden-only admission. See the website for full details.

The exterior of Hills and Dales Estate in Atlanta. The facade is white with columns. There is a garden with topiaries in front of the house. Karon Warren

6. The Wren's Nest

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1050 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd
Atlanta, GA 30310
(404) 753-7735
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Home to author Joel Chandler Harris from 1881 to 1908, The Wren’s Nest in Atlanta actually began as a circa-1870 farmhouse. The Harrises would change that after they purchased the property, remodeling it in the 1880s to incorporate the current Queen Anne Victorian style. The home was converted to a museum in 1913, and was named a National Historic Landmark in 1962.

Tours are available each Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with storytelling every Saturday at 1 p.m. Weekday tours are available by appointment. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children, seniors, and students.

7. The Boyhood Home of President Woodrow Wilson

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419 7th St
Augusta, GA 30901
(706) 722-9828
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Located in Augusta, the 1859 brick home that would serve as a future president’s residence didn’t start with such a lofty purpose. It was actually built by Aaron J. Jones, who would sell it after completion without ever living here. It then went on to become the manse for the First Presbyterian Church, which brought The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Ruggles Wilson and their children, including son Thomas Woodrow Wilson, here in 1860. During their tenure, the Wilson family would witness the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Guided tours of the Boyhood Home are available Thursday through Saturday on the hour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $3 for K-12 students, and free for kids younger than 5.

8. Andalusia: The Home of Flannery O'Connor

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2628 N Columbia St
Milledgeville, GA 31061
(478) 445-8722
Visit Website

From 1951 to 1964, celebrated author Flannery O’Connor would call Andalusia in Milledgeville home. But prior to her arrival here with her uncle, Dr. Bernard Cline, the home had begun as a cotton plantation and farm in 1814. The house and its grounds would served as inspiration for the setting in many of O’Connor’s literary works.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, the property is open for tours Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m. It is closed on holidays, so consult the website for current hours at these times. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for seniors age 60 and older, $2 for students, and free for children younger than 6.

9. Margaret Mitchell House

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979 Crescent Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30309
(404) 249-7015
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Located in Midtown, the Margaret Mitchell House actually was subdivided into apartments when the famed author lived here. In fact, her apartment, which she called “The Dump,” was located in the basement. It was in this shabby apartment where Mitchell would write her most famous work, Gone With the Wind. Today, when touring the house, visitors will learn about Mitchell’s life, including stories of her marriages and why she wasn’t accepted by the “good girls” of Atlanta society.

Tours are offered Monday through Saturday every half hour from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and on Sundays every half hour from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Admission is $13 for adults, $10 for students (13+) and seniors (65+), $5.50 for kids ages 4 to 12, and free for children age 3 and younger.

10. Johnston–Felton–Hay House

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934 Georgia Ave
Macon, GA 31201
(478) 742-8155
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Construction on the Johnston-Felton-Hay House in Macon lasted four years, but, upon its completion in 1859, it would become an outstanding example of the Italian Renaissance Revival style. The 18,000-square-foot home encompasses four stories, including a two-story cupola. At the time it was built, it included modern features unheard of at the time: hot and cold running water, central heat, gas lighting, a speaker-tube system, an in-house kitchen, and a ventilation system.

Tours are available Monday through Saturday at the top of the hour from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $11 for adults, $10 for seniors ages 65 and older and military with ID, and free for kids younger than 6. Behind-the-scenes tours are offered twice a month for $25 per person. See the website for schedule and full details.

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1. Governor's Mansion

391 West Paces Ferry Rd NW, Atlanta, GA 30305

Following the Greek Revival style, the Georgia Governor’s Mansion on West Paces Ferry Road features 30 rooms on three floors. Designed by Georgia architect A. Thomas Bradbury, the 1967 residence actually first opened on January 1, 1968, with Lester Maddox as the first governor to call it home. The 24,000-square-foot residence is open for free tours on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays between 10 and 11:30 a.m.

To prepare for Christmas tours, the home generally closes to the public in mid-November and reopens at the beginning of December. Check the website for a current tour schedule.

391 West Paces Ferry Rd NW
Atlanta, GA 30305

2. Old Governors Mansion

Old Governors Mansion, Milledgeville, GA 31061

Long before Atlanta was named the state capital for Georgia, Milledgeville held that honor. As such, an official governor’s residence was in order. Hence, Georgia’s Old Governor’s Mansion was completed in 1839. Designed by architect Charles Cluskey, the High Greek Revival home remained in service until 1868.

Tours are available Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m. It does close for holidays, so check the schedule before going. Tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for seniors age 60 and older, $2 for students, and free for children younger than 6.

Old Governors Mansion
Milledgeville, GA 31061

3. Swan House

3130 Slaton Dr NW, Atlanta, GA 30305
The exterior of Swan house in Atlanta. The house is white and is surrounded by trees, shrubs, and grass. Julie Anne Photography LLC

Located in Buckhead at the Atlanta History Center, the Swan House continues to be an iconic destination for history and architecture buffs. Built in 1928 as the home of Edward and Emily Inman, the home was a notable project in the portfolio of renowned architect Philip Trammell Shutze.

It’s open for tours Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m. A behind-the-scenes tour also is offered daily at 4 p.m. for $10 per person plus general admission to the Atlanta History Center. General admission tickets to the Atlanta History Center are $21.50 for adults, $18 for seniors ages 65 and older, $18 for students ages 13 and older, and $9 for children ages 4 to 12.

3130 Slaton Dr NW
Atlanta, GA 30305

4. Roosevelt's Little White House Historic Site

401 Little White House Rd, Warm Springs, GA 31830
The exterior of Roosevelt’s little white house historic site in Atlanta. The facade is white with a grey roof. There are columns near the entrance and a chimney on the roof. Georgia Department of Natural Resources

Built in 1932 by Franklin D. Roosevelt during his tenure as governor of New York, the Little White House in Warm Springs served as an escape for the man who became president in 1933. But his journey to Warm Springs actually began in 1924 when Roosevelt first visited Warm Springs to take advantage of the area’s curative springs for his polio. While he was not cured, he did improve, and, thus, continued to return here often.

Today, visitors can tour the Little White House, which is preserved much as he left it, as well as the servant and guest quarters, the warm springs pools, and a memorial museum. Site hours are 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. daily. Admission is $12 for adults, $10 for seniors ages 62 and older, $7 for kids ages 6 to 17, and $2 for children younger than 6.

401 Little White House Rd
Warm Springs, GA 31830

5. Hills & Dales Estate

1916 Hills and Dales Dr, LaGrange, GA 30240
The exterior of Hills and Dales Estate in Atlanta. The facade is white with columns. There is a garden with topiaries in front of the house. Karon Warren

Completed as it stands today in 1916 by Fuller E. Callaway, HIlls & Dales in LaGrange actually stands on the same grounds as the home of the property’s previous owner, Sarah Ferrell. It was “Miss Sarah” who started the gardens here. After her death, Callaway bought the property, replacing the previous house with the grand design you see today. His wife, Ida Cason Callaway, would carry on Sarah’s legacy in the gardens as would her daughter-in-law, Alice Hand Callaway.

Tours are available on a seasonal schedule, with tickets available for both house and garden admission as well as garden-only admission. See the website for full details.

1916 Hills and Dales Dr
LaGrange, GA 30240

6. The Wren's Nest

1050 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd, Atlanta, GA 30310

Home to author Joel Chandler Harris from 1881 to 1908, The Wren’s Nest in Atlanta actually began as a circa-1870 farmhouse. The Harrises would change that after they purchased the property, remodeling it in the 1880s to incorporate the current Queen Anne Victorian style. The home was converted to a museum in 1913, and was named a National Historic Landmark in 1962.

Tours are available each Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with storytelling every Saturday at 1 p.m. Weekday tours are available by appointment. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children, seniors, and students.

1050 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd
Atlanta, GA 30310

7. The Boyhood Home of President Woodrow Wilson

419 7th St, Augusta, GA 30901

Located in Augusta, the 1859 brick home that would serve as a future president’s residence didn’t start with such a lofty purpose. It was actually built by Aaron J. Jones, who would sell it after completion without ever living here. It then went on to become the manse for the First Presbyterian Church, which brought The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Ruggles Wilson and their children, including son Thomas Woodrow Wilson, here in 1860. During their tenure, the Wilson family would witness the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Guided tours of the Boyhood Home are available Thursday through Saturday on the hour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $3 for K-12 students, and free for kids younger than 5.

419 7th St
Augusta, GA 30901

8. Andalusia: The Home of Flannery O'Connor

2628 N Columbia St, Milledgeville, GA 31061

From 1951 to 1964, celebrated author Flannery O’Connor would call Andalusia in Milledgeville home. But prior to her arrival here with her uncle, Dr. Bernard Cline, the home had begun as a cotton plantation and farm in 1814. The house and its grounds would served as inspiration for the setting in many of O’Connor’s literary works.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, the property is open for tours Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m. It is closed on holidays, so consult the website for current hours at these times. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for seniors age 60 and older, $2 for students, and free for children younger than 6.

2628 N Columbia St
Milledgeville, GA 31061

9. Margaret Mitchell House

979 Crescent Ave NE, Atlanta, GA 30309

Located in Midtown, the Margaret Mitchell House actually was subdivided into apartments when the famed author lived here. In fact, her apartment, which she called “The Dump,” was located in the basement. It was in this shabby apartment where Mitchell would write her most famous work, Gone With the Wind. Today, when touring the house, visitors will learn about Mitchell’s life, including stories of her marriages and why she wasn’t accepted by the “good girls” of Atlanta society.

Tours are offered Monday through Saturday every half hour from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and on Sundays every half hour from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Admission is $13 for adults, $10 for students (13+) and seniors (65+), $5.50 for kids ages 4 to 12, and free for children age 3 and younger.

979 Crescent Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30309

10. Johnston–Felton–Hay House

934 Georgia Ave, Macon, GA 31201

Construction on the Johnston-Felton-Hay House in Macon lasted four years, but, upon its completion in 1859, it would become an outstanding example of the Italian Renaissance Revival style. The 18,000-square-foot home encompasses four stories, including a two-story cupola. At the time it was built, it included modern features unheard of at the time: hot and cold running water, central heat, gas lighting, a speaker-tube system, an in-house kitchen, and a ventilation system.

Tours are available Monday through Saturday at the top of the hour from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets are $11 for adults, $10 for seniors ages 65 and older and military with ID, and free for kids younger than 6. Behind-the-scenes tours are offered twice a month for $25 per person. See the website for schedule and full details.

934 Georgia Ave
Macon, GA 31201